When Cory Batey was a 19-year-old standout football player at Vanderbilt, he raped an unconscious woman. The ample evidence, including security cameras showing the unconscious woman being carried into a dorm room and cellphone photos and videos of the sexual assault, was clear — Cory Batey sexually assaulted the woman. In April, a jury found Batey guilty of three felony counts including aggravated rape and two counts of aggravated sexual battery.

He was immediately remanded into custody and must serve a mandatory minimum sentence of 15 to 25 years in prison.

What Batey did was reprehensible. The judge and jury treated his crime as such.

 

That’s what makes the case of Brock Turner, a 19-year-old standout swimmer at Stanford who raped an unconscious woman, all the more infuriating. As was the case with Batey, ample evidence existed that Turner was guilty. Eyewitnesses actually caught him in the act as he sexually assaulted an unconscious woman behind a dumpster. A jury agreed and Turner was found guilty of multiple felony rape charges. Turner, though, was given a six-month jail sentence and told he could be released on good behavior in as little as three months. He won’t even go to an actual prison, but will remain in the local jail during that time.

One man is black and the other is white. I won’t even ask you to guess which is which. This is America.

The judge in the Turner case, Aaron Persky, who was also a standout athlete in a stuffy, predominantly white sport at Stanford, seemed to see himself in the young man and felt that a long prison sentence for Turner would be an overreach of justice and stated publicly that “a prison sentence would have a severe impact on him.” Isn’t that the point of a prison sentence?

 

via King: Brock Turner, Cory Batey show how race affects sentencing
Shaun King
SHAUN KING
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Updated: Tuesday, June 7, 2016, 5:42 PM