An African American student in St. Louis was just told that he cannot attend the school he wants to because of nothing more than his skin color.

The youth’s mother says she is “in shock” since hearing that her son’s skin color is precluding him from attending the school of his choice.




The third grader, Edmund Lee, is African-American, and a charter school in south St. Louis says that means he cannot attented.

His family is planning on moving to St. Louis County this year, so they have been trying to get everything in order with what school their son will attend. But his ethnicity has proven a road block – almost unbelievably.

Local Fox 2 News explains that “certain rules in place allow some county residents the opportunity to attend a city charter school, but they must live in a district participating in transfer programs, and can not be an African-American.”

“When I read the guidelines I was in shock,” La’Shieka White, Edmund’s mother, explained. “I was crying.”

School officials say that “rules are rules” and that their “hands are tied because of regulations created decades ago as part of a desegregation settlement,” Jeff Bernthal, with Fox 2 explained.




But some leaders at Gateway Science Academy say that it is “time to revisit those rules.”

“If this helps us start a conversation about maybe some things that could be different with the law, then that is as good thing,” Assistant Principal Janet Moak said.

White has now started a petition that calls on lawmakers to take action and rectify this situation.

She’s said that this also effects Caucasian students, as she has heard from such parents, that their children are “unable to participate in transfer programs for African-Americans.”

“I don’t want it to be just about an African-American boy,” White explained. “I want it to be about all children.”

Some of the staff members at Gateway Science Academy have even signed White’s petition and are encouraging you to do so too.

“To not see his face in the halls next year would be extremely sad,” said Tiffany Luis,” Edmund’s 3rd grade teacher said. “The family is saying they want to stay. I don’t understand why they can’t.”